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BHS is No. 1 in College in the Schools program

Students at Burnsville High School get a jump start into post-secondary learning by taking college-level courses right at their school.


Burnsville High School teacher Katie Burke works with students in her College in the Schools writing class.

One way is through College in the Schools (CIS) and students have been enthusiastic about this program. In fact, Burnsville High School ranked first in participation and credits earned from among the 125 high schools that offer CIS through the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities.

Last year, BHS students set a new record for their school by earning 3,653 credits which saved them nearly $1.7 million in tuition since high school students do not pay to take CIS classes. Earned credits apply to the University of Minnesota but also transfer to other colleges and universities across the country.

"By taking CIS classes, students experience the rigor and increased pace of a college class while still in the comfortable support of their high school," said Principal Dave Helke. "This is the best possible preparation for future success at colleges and universities."

Burnsville High School offers CIS courses in American History, government, economics, literature, writing, calculus, sociology, public speaking, Spanish level 5 and French level 5. High school students taking CIS courses follow the same curriculum and are held to the same academic standards as students on the University of Minnesota campus.

Seventeen teachers in District 191 have been selected to receive training from the University of Minnesota to teach CIS courses. They are Kristina Aars, Katie Burke, Colleen Coleman, Wendy Drugge, Michelle Dyrhaug, Matt Eppen, Michael Franssen, Sara Holcombe, Tim Lehner, Dave McDevitt, Teresa Meuser, Ben Stapp, Nate Strand, Katherine Van Schoonhoven, Gloria Webber, David Weinberg and Kathryn Wendling.

“We are fortunate to have so many teachers dedicated to their own professional learning and active in all of the professional development and networking opportunities available through CIS," said Helke. "Their impact on the achievement of our students is evident in these numbers.”

Posted: Monday, October 13, 2014 - 15:26